shutterstock_1209757795_dark.jpg

Why it Matters

In losing the cryosphere (the frozen parts of the Earth's surface), we lose the Arctic sea ice, an essential planetary climate operating system that connects with all of the other components of the Earth’s climate systems.  

derek-oyen-m5r2FFo8NJM-unsplash.jpg

1988

Atmospheric CO2
350

parts per million (ppm)

Average September

sea ice extent
7.4

million km2

2020

Atmospheric CO2
414

parts per million (ppm)

Average September

sea ice extent
3.9

million km2

2021

Atmospheric CO2
421 

parts per million (ppm)

Average September

sea ice extent
4.9

million km2

Data sources: CO2 measurements from NOAA/GML & Scripps Institution of Oceanography at Mauna Loa Observatory 
Avg. Sept. Sea Ice Extent from NSIDC Sea Ice Index, Version 3

Arctic sea ice extent hovered at its second lowest in 2020 since NASA began satellite tracking in 1979.

derek-oyen-m5r2FFo8NJM-unsplash.jpg

The rapid climate changes in the Arctic are affecting not only the Indigenous Peoples living there but also Indigenous People in far-flung places. Marshall Islanders and many inhabitants of Small Island States will lose their home. AMAP, 2021

marshall_island.jpg
Visit-Greenland-Inuit